QaRt Codes

We have an exciting group show coming to Pleiades Gallery this January called “transFORM.”  The show will be up from January 7th – February 15th, with an opening reception on January 17th from 6-9pm.

I focused specifically on transformation through technology.  I made five paintings.  Four of the pieces each explore about what is lost, or diminished, when experienced through technology.  To emphasize this message, the original painting was photographed, then completed painted over with a QR code.  The original painting can now only be accessed through scanning the QR code, each one “transFORMed” by technology, and now only existing in a virtual format.

One of the paintings has a slightly different message.  In this piece, titled “Golden Ticket,” the QR code’s URL will be updated at random intervals.  The person who owns this piece, or one of the 10 limited edition prints, will be given access to a unique “shared experience” through scanning the QR code.  I will be updating the URL will short videos, drawings, handwritten notes, etc.  As the artist, I will challenge myself to create a more intimate experience for this small group, by sharing things that are less guarded than what I post on Facebook, etc.  This piece explores the connections that could not be possible without technology.

I don’t want to say too much about the pieces specifically, because they are best experienced.  When you get to the URL with the image of the painting, look around for small messages and links to help you further experience the piece. It’s best to open this on a desktop or laptop and scan with your smartphone.  All the QR codes are hand-painted.

Khuwailah, The Queen of Swords

I have completed another painting in the An-Noor series.  I thought I was finished with this painting many times…I actually started writing this blog post a couple of weeks ago, and as I was writing it, it became really clear to me that it was incomplete.  Anyway, the subject is Khuwailah, a woman I met in Durham a few years ago.

While looking for inspiration for this painting, I looked through my deck of Tarot cards.  The deck is full of symbolic images (that’s kind of the whole point), and I picked out all of the images that spoke to me, and that included a female figure.  I found surprisingly few female cards (like 15 or 16 out of 78 cards).  Of those cards, there was one card that stood out to me, that connected to this particular subject… the Queen of Swords.

Her major characteristics are that she is “Honest, Astute, Forthright, Witty, and Experienced.”  As I read more into her character, I found that it was really a perfect fit.  But what do I do with this image?  I included a few visual references to it in my painting.

I have never photographed a painting thinking that it was done as many times as I did with this one.  Every time I took “the final picture” I would immediately see how I could improve it.  It was unusual, but I’m glad I didn’t just settle for it being done before it really was.  The biggest issue I had was to figure out what to paint through the window and how to paint it.  I originally planned to have some stylized clouds very similar to those on the tarot card, but they didn’t fit with the rest of the image, to me.  So then I just painted over them, but that was really boring.  It needed more magic.  Eventually I tried to channel some Bob Ross with the happy little clouds (and the trees that were there at one point, too).  I’m really really pleased with it, finally!

Check out the gallery to see pictures of the process, and a few of the different versions of this painting.


A couple more things about this painting:

The pattern:  I googled images of African patterns and textiles (my research methods are highly developed, clearly), and tried to get a good sense of what characteristics make them distinct.  I saw a lot of these concentric diamonds.  The pattern I ended up using (I design most of my patterns, but this one is honestly a bit of a knock-off of a rug I came across) is a more geometric and modern looking version of these concentric diamonds.  I struggled some with finding the right balance of colors in the background and pattern… so that they pattern was not distracting but still visible, harmonious with the figure and the window, etc.
Gothic Window with Foil Arches

The window: I love when paintings have windows in them… I particularly like when they have a whole painting inside of a painting, basically, with the scene outside of the window.  I wanted to give the sense that Khuwailah was sitting high up into the sky.  Anyhow, the structure/form of the window was derived from the windows on gothic churches and buildings.

The Evolution of Dina

Image

This is the largest painting I have completed to date (the third painting of the “An-Noor” series). It is six feet tall and four feet wide. I learned a lot through the process. In my sketches, I left a number of details unplanned (how exactly to deal with the negative space in the background, what is she sitting on?, what is that book in her lap?)… which would have been fine, except that it takes a lot of time (and paint) to try to figure these details out on the canvas. It took me three months to paint, and repaint, and repaint, this portrait.

If you scroll through the gallery, it is clear that I started out thinking that the painting would have a red background. This painting almost broke me in two. I remember looking at the layers of red in the around the sun and finally allowing myself to admit, “It’s beautiful, but it’s not right.” And I knew for sure that I had to paint over all those hours of work, that I had to redo the mess that I had made of the gold leaf. I may or may not have cried. Of course, immediately after doing so, I wondered if I was making a huge mistake. But it wasn’t a mistake. I had to trust my instincts, and push through it, and I love the final image. She is life-size-ish, and the gold leaf (my first time using this material) is f@*king brilliant. When I photographed it, it reflected the sunlight so strongly it hurt my eyes.

Dina is posed as Norman Rockwell’s Rosie the Riveter. I don’t want to go into great detail describing the imagery/symbolism in the spine of the book, or the sunflower… because I feel that it comes across? I would encourage you, however, to look closely at the spine of the book for some symbols of this woman and her power. Dina is a wonderful and inspiring woman. She grew up in North Carolina, and identifies with both her Southern and Egyptian roots. Who says collared greens and grape leaves don’t belong on the same plate? ❤

She will be hanging at the Carrack Modern Art this weekend for their last community show of 2012! Reception is this Friday.

Here is a gallery of pictures that shows the process (most are cellphone pics).